Kubernetes

Updated: 2020-11-14

Kubernetes Applications

  • Stateless applications: trivial to scale, with no coordination. These can take advantage of Kubernetes deployments directly and work great behind Kubernetes Services or Ingress Services.
  • Stateful applications: postgres, mysql, etc which generally exist as single processes and persist to disks. These systems generally should be pinned to a single machine and use a single Kubernetes persistent disk. These systems can be served by static configuration of pods, persistent disks, etc or utilize StatefulSets.
  • Static distributed applications: zookeeper, cassandra, etc which are hard to reconfigure at runtime but do replicate data around for data safety. These systems have configuration files that are hard to update consistently and are well-served by StatefulSets.
  • Clustered applications: etcd, redis, prometheus, vitess, rethinkdb, etc are built for dynamic reconfiguration and modern infrastructure where things are often changing. They have APIs to reconfigure members in the cluster and just need glue to be operated natively seemlessly on Kubernetes, and thus the Kubernetes Operator concept

Kubernetes vs OpenStack

Openstack was launched in 2010. AWS was the only Cloud, GCP didn't exist, Docker was not a thing. The goal was to provide an open source and private alternative to AWS; building on top of VMs.

Kubernetees was launched in 2014. AWS, Azure, GCP became dominant players of Cloud computing, Docker became the synonym of container. The goal was to be a bridge among the big 3, and between public cloud and private data centers; building on top of containers.

OpenStack is dying down. Kubernetes is the winner, for now.

Knative

https://knative.dev/

Kubernetes-based platform to deploy and manage modern serverless workloads.

Serverless users are afraid of vendor lock-in, so Knative is created to make serverless standardized and portable.

Google Cloud Run is a re-implementation of the same Knative Serving API.